A Nurse with a Gun

Saturday, January 27, 2007

Nambu vs 1911A1



Thanks to a reader, here is a translation of the video.

Hello, readers! I’m Morohoshi, reporting from Las Vegas.
[Display on lower left: Reporter: Las Vegas office, Etsuo Morohoshi]
The Year 14 Type is an automatic pistol that was formally adopted by the Japanese Army in Year 14 of the Taisho Era, 1925.
Its caliber is 8 mm and its capacity is 8 shots. It was the first pistol to be accepted in Japan as a standard military weapon.
Overall, with the many straight lines in its outline, it bears a strong resemblance to the German Luger.
The rifling is (unintelligible) and, as you can see, very clearly defined, even after 60 years.
When the magazine is installed and you pull on the slide, it stops in the open position. When there is no magazine, the slide stop does not function.
The safety is on the left side of the gun. To place the gun in the “Safe” condition, you rotate the lever 180 degrees (NOTE, “Fire” is forward, “Safe” is back).
Well, then, let’s show you how to field-strip the Type 14.
First, you check the chamber.
Then, you pull the trigger once to lower the firing pin. Next, holding down the rear end of the firing pin extension, which is in the center of the cocking piece, you rotate it counter-clockwise.
Once the cocking piece is off, the firing pin extension and the spring can be removed.
Next, pulling a little on the slide, you pull down on the trigger guard, this releases the trigger assembly, and at the same time, the barrel and bolt come off. You take the bolt out of the receiver, and after you remove the recoil springs and the firing pin, that completes the field-stripping.
The serial number was marked on nearly all the parts.
Once you’ve taken it apart, it seems pretty simple, but in comparison to the American 1911 of the time, you can see that it has more parts after field-stripping.
Well, next, let’s watch a shooting test. We decided to compare it with a 1911, which was a contemporary of this pistol.

I will start by measuring the muzzle velocities.
[Upper left display: Muzzle Velocity Test]
We measured the muzzle energy of the bullets using the muzzle velocities. As you can see, in comparison to the 1911, the Type 14 has much lower power. Particularly, it had less than half the stopping power (NPF) shown by the figures.
The 8-mm Type 14 cartridges we used in this test were not originals. We saw that they were somewhat slower than the standard cartridges of the time, whose muzzle velocity was announced to be 317 meters per second. Also, when we actually fired them, the recoil was on the mild side.
Next, we’ll do a grouping test.
[Upper left display, Target Grouping Test; Bottom display, Distance to target 15 yards]
First, we do a shooting test with the 1911, a pistol we get a lot of opportunities to shoot.
The results: a 4-inch group.
Next is the Type 14 pistol.
We have high expectations for the pistol which, at the time, had a worldwide reputation as a pretty accurate model.
The results: About an 8-inch group.
It was a single-action, so the trigger was smooth and very good, but even though I used the same hold, some of the shots were pretty far off. We could not tell if this was the fault of the pistol or if the cartridges we had used were defective.
Next, we carried out a rapid-fire test.
[Upper left display: Rapid-fire test]
The 1911 has a heavy recoil, so to that extent, it felt less stable.
(Pointing to target) These small holes are the Type 14, and the big ones are from the 1911. The smaller ones show a better pattern. As you might expect, the Type 14 may be a little more appropriate for Japanese.

We carried out a comparison penetration test using 2.5 cm thick boards.
[Upper left display: Pine board penetration test]
(looking at the Box o’ Truth) Now, we’re looking at what we got shooting the 1911. One, two, three, four, five, six… in the seventh board, we have a dent. And the bullet… it still is in about its original shape.
(fires the Nambu)
One, two, three, four… in the fifth board, it’s stopped. The bullet is here. It’s kind of smashed.
The results of the pine board penetration test also put the 1911 out front.

Next, we shoot a helmet.
[Upper left display: Helmet penetration test]
This steel helmet is one that was used by the American Army during the Second World War.
(pointing to the helmet) It didn’t penetrate.
(holding helmet after firing 1911) The 1911 didn’t penetrate either.
Both shots were deflected by the helmet; they didn’t even leave cracks. The dents were also about the same size.
In this test, unfortunately, considering all of the results, the Type 14 pistol did not turn out to be superior to the 1911. On the contrary, we can consider that this is proof of the perfection of the 1911, which is still in active service on the front lines.

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17 Comments:

Blogger Conservative Scalawag said...

I didn't need a translator to undertand the 1911A1 is better than the Nambo. Though it would've been nice to understand what the guy was saying.

6:35 AM  
Blogger Conservative Scalawag said...

I didn't need a translator to undertand the 1911A1 is better than the Nambu. Though it would've been nice to understand what the guy was saying.

6:35 AM  
Blogger Mulliga said...

Interesting video. I think a more fun competition might be a 1911A1 vs. a Luger - results would be much closer, I think.

While the 1911 totally outclasses the Nambu here, I sometimes wonder what would happen if Japanese small arms development continued after WWII. Given the country's proficiency at turning out quality cars and electronics, there's every reason to think quality firearm designs would have ensued.

8:23 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Roger.45,

I would like to know what he was saying,too.

Beside my extreme prejudice for the 1911, I always remember what a friend once said. We were discussing the M1 Garand and the Type99 Arisaka. I mentioned the crude appearance and clumsy bolt action of the Type 99. My friend put it into perspective for me. "In the hands of an experienced marksman, the 99 will kill a soldier just as dead as the Garand." Those words have stayed with me for a long time.

10:10 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

That was pretty neat. What made me laugh is that gun experts from Japan are exactly like ones from north america. Beard, rayban's, photographer vest, khaki, the whole nine yards.

10:33 AM  
Anonymous Alex said...

I guess there are no Japanese words for "firing pin" and "recoil spring."

11:46 AM  
Anonymous Zane said...

Aye Alex. I have a friend who lived in Japan for a while, and speaks the language quite well, he once explained to me that the reason you hear words like "slid-u stop-e" in Japanese is that the language is quite old. It has not gone through any major changes for quite a long time, and the Japanese have always been keen to take the effective things about other cultures and make them their own; such as the Chinese writing system. They do the same with modern parlance from the English language. However, the syllabic structure of Japanese requires that there almost be a vowell paired with a consonant. Thus we get words that are ALMOST english, but pronounced in that characteristic Japanese way. Hope that was helpful and educational. I also hope that I am correct in my knowledge. If I am, you are welcome, if I'm not....its my pal's fault. :D If this is wrong, somebody please correct it.

Always eager to learn over here.

1:31 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Nor Trigger Assembly.

It isn't that uncommon for other languages to aquire words describing technologies developed in other nations, just look at how many languages use English computer terms.

1:50 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I'm sure there is no gun toting experts in Japan... Japan is a big-no-no-gun-country... I can bet He is an Japanese speaking American that don't know what word to use for firing pin and recoil spring :)

herrmannek

2:19 PM  
Anonymous Feng_Li said...

Or "firing pin extension," or "stopping power," for that matter. The number of cognates was really surprising.

2:32 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I was unaware that the box o truth had a franchise in Japan.

EricN

4:52 PM  
Blogger James R. Rummel said...

Good post.

James

9:30 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

And the winner and still champion is... the M-1911A1. I noticed a couple of things other posters have mentioned plus, no one noticed the porno-video music. Firearms in Japan must be like porn is here. Also, that vest. Where did he get that thing? It looked like it was interfering with his movement. The corset laces got me laughing as well.

10:41 AM  
Blogger Dr. StrangeGun said...

Huh. Didn't have a clue that a Nambu was nearly 1911 sized, perhaps even longer in the grip.

12:05 PM  
Blogger Citizen H said...

With a Nambu, accuracy isn't an issue. Come on, you're talking about a pistol used frequently to shoot prisoners in the back of the head from short distances. Why worry about tight groups? You might as well test the accuracy potential of bayonets.

9:44 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

really interesting for a Brit like me denied access to old gems like the Nambu to get a good 3d look at one.

Man Magnum Magazine in south Africa did a review and test shoot of some nambus before Christmas and were pleasantly surprised by the handling and accuracy. I'm not saying that it would compete with a 1911, but few guns do.

Nambu vs Luger would be a more realistic comparison, as both are developing technology, the 1911 represents that technology becoming mature, and let's face it a 1911 would give a beretta or virtually any other gun a good run for its' money in reliability simplicity of use and longevity.

Apart from the Ruger .22 pistols, seperate bolts in tubular receivers were rightfully obsolete after browning invented the enclosed slide (the L35 Lahti was an anachronism)But even the nambu made some interesting simplifications in doing away with narrow little slideways.

If it came to throwing them in the mud, I suspect that the Nambus' simple trigger mech would bugger up less than a Luger's overcomplex mechanism. I still think that few would come close to 1911 reliability when it gets dirty...

1:02 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Here is a translation of the video.

Hello, readers! I’m Morohoshi, reporting from Las Vegas.
[Display on lower left: Reporter: Las Vegas office, Etsuo Morohoshi]
The Year 14 Type is an automatic pistol that was formally adopted by the Japanese Army in Year 14 of the Taisho Era, 1925.
Its caliber is 8 mm and its capacity is 8 shots. It was the first pistol to be accepted in Japan as a standard military weapon.
Overall, with the many straight lines in its outline, it bears a strong resemblance to the German Luger.
The rifling is (unintelligible) and, as you can see, very clearly defined, even after 60 years.
When the magazine is installed and you pull on the slide, it stops in the open position. When there is no magazine, the slide stop does not function.
The safety is on the left side of the gun. To place the gun in the “Safe” condition, you rotate the lever 180 degrees (NOTE, “Fire” is forward, “Safe” is back).
Well, then, let’s show you how to field-strip the Type 14.
First, you check the chamber.
Then, you pull the trigger once to lower the firing pin. Next, holding down the rear end of the firing pin extension, which is in the center of the cocking piece, you rotate it counter-clockwise.
Once the cocking piece is off, the firing pin extension and the spring can be removed.
Next, pulling a little on the slide, you pull down on the trigger guard, this releases the trigger assembly, and at the same time, the barrel and bolt come off. You take the bolt out of the receiver, and after you remove the recoil springs and the firing pin, that completes the field-stripping.
The serial number was marked on nearly all the parts.
Once you’ve taken it apart, it seems pretty simple, but in comparison to the American 1911 of the time, you can see that it has more parts after field-stripping.
Well, next, let’s watch a shooting test. We decided to compare it with a 1911, which was a contemporary of this pistol.

I will start by measuring the muzzle velocities.
[Upper left display: Muzzle Velocity Test]
We measured the muzzle energy of the bullets using the muzzle velocities. As you can see, in comparison to the 1911, the Type 14 has much lower power. Particularly, it had less than half the stopping power (NPF) shown by the figures.
The 8-mm Type 14 cartridges we used in this test were not originals. We saw that they were somewhat slower than the standard cartridges of the time, whose muzzle velocity was announced to be 317 meters per second. Also, when we actually fired them, the recoil was on the mild side.
Next, we’ll do a grouping test.
[Upper left display, Target Grouping Test; Bottom display, Distance to target 15 yards]
First, we do a shooting test with the 1911, a pistol we get a lot of opportunities to shoot.
The results: a 4-inch group.
Next is the Type 14 pistol.
We have high expectations for the pistol which, at the time, had a worldwide reputation as a pretty accurate model.
The results: About an 8-inch group.
It was a single-action, so the trigger was smooth and very good, but even though I used the same hold, some of the shots were pretty far off. We could not tell if this was the fault of the pistol or if the cartridges we had used were defective.
Next, we carried out a rapid-fire test.
[Upper left display: Rapid-fire test]
The 1911 has a heavy recoil, so to that extent, it felt less stable.
(Pointing to target) These small holes are the Type 14, and the big ones are from the 1911. The smaller ones show a better pattern. As you might expect, the Type 14 may be a little more appropriate for Japanese.

We carried out a comparison penetration test using 2.5 cm thick boards.
[Upper left display: Pine board penetration test]
(looking at the Box o’ Truth) Now, we’re looking at what we got shooting the 1911. One, two, three, four, five, six… in the seventh board, we have a dent. And the bullet… it still is in about its original shape.
(fires the Nambu)
One, two, three, four… in the fifth board, it’s stopped. The bullet is here. It’s kind of smashed.
The results of the pine board penetration test also put the 1911 out front.

Next, we shoot a helmet.
[Upper left display: Helmet penetration test]
This steel helmet is one that was used by the American Army during the Second World War.
(pointing to the helmet) It didn’t penetrate.
(holding helmet after firing 1911) The 1911 didn’t penetrate either.
Both shots were deflected by the helmet; they didn’t even leave cracks. The dents were also about the same size.
In this test, unfortunately, considering all of the results, the Type 14 pistol did not turn out to be superior to the 1911. On the contrary, we can consider that this is proof of the perfection of the 1911, which is still in active service on the front lines.
++++++
DKDay

11:38 PM  

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